Method of finishing a garment edge

  • Inventors: NELSON JACK
  • Assignees: Nelson Jack
  • Publication Date: July 04, 1961
  • Publication Number: US-2990554-A

Abstract

Claims

y 4, 1961 J. NELSON 2,990,554 METHOD OF FINISHING A GARMENT EDGE Filed Jan. 21, 1959 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. JACK NE LSON A TTORNEY July 4, 1961 J. NELSON METHOD OF FINISHING A GARMENT EDGE 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 21. 1959 REVERSE R m5 mL WE N K C A w J Y TTOBNEY y 1961 J. NELSON 2,990,554 METHOD OF FINISHINGAGARMENT EDGE Filed Jan. 21. 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. JACK NELSON TTOKIVEY United States Patent 2,990,554 METHOD OF FINISHING A GARMENT EDGE Jack Nelson, 2700 Heath Ave, New York, NY. Filed Jan. 21, 1959, Ser. No. 788,192 3 Claims. (Cl. 2-274) This invention relates to a method of finishing the edges of articles of clothing, particularly womens suits and jackets. In the manufacture and tailoring of womens suits and jackets, it has been found particularly desirable to form the jacket without the application of the usual facing material in the region of the lapels. However, with the elimination of the facing material, problems have developed with relation to the finishing of the side edges of the garment. It has been found difficult to achieve a suitably finished edge wherein the raw edges of the cloth do not show and wherein the finished edges are not unduly bulky. Furthermore, it has been found that the tendency of the single fabric layer to distort and stretch makes it difiicult to achieve a garment presenting the desired qualities of fit, appearance and shape retention. It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a method for finishing the edges of a garment of the character indicated wherein there is presented a highly finished edge structure from which the appearance of the raw edge of the cloth is completely eliminated and wherein the tendency of the cloth to distort, stretch, or otherwise lose itsshape, is eliminated. In order to accomplish these and other purposes, a method is provided for the incorporation of a binding tape along the raw edges of the cloth, which is then turned, trimmed, folded and stitched in order to present a" highly finished appearance for the garment and provide an edge reinforcement therefor whereby the desired 'qualities of fit, appearance and shape retention are achieved. Furthermore, a method is provided to impart 'a finished appearance to the apex portion of the'lapel notch by the application of a gusset of the garment material thereto.- These and other objects, benefits and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the description thereof contained in the annexed specification or will otherwise become obvious. It will be understood that the invention here disclosed may be employed for other purposes to which the structure and arrangement are adapted. In the accompanying drawings: FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary elevational view of a garment lapel at an initial stage of its formation; FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary elevational view of a garment lapel after the initial application of the tape binding material thereto; FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary elevational view of the lapel shown in FIGURE 2 after the edge thereof has been turned, showing the reverse surface of the lapel; FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary view of the lapel shown in FIGURE 3 at a later stage and after excess portions of the binding tape have have been trimmed away; FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary View of a lapel point as it appears prior to being clipped; FIGURE 6 is an elevational view of the lapel shown in FIGURE 3 at a later stage, wherein the edge of the lapel has again been folded over in order to complete the finish of the lapel edge; FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary elevational view of the lapel as it appears in completed form having been folded into position along the roll line of the lapel; FIGURE 8 is a cross-section of FIGURE 2 taken along line 8-8 thereof, showing the manner in which the binding tape is stitched to the gusset; 2,990,554 Patented July 4, 1961 FIGURE 9 is a sectional view of the edge of the lower portion of the lapel showing the reversal of the tape at the lower end of the roll line of the lapel as it is applied to the lower portion of the jacket; FIGURE 10 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of the lapel taken along line 10-10 of FIGURE 3; FIGURE 11 is a cross-section of the finished edge of the lapel taken along line 11-=11 of FIGURE 6*; FIGURE 12 is a fragmentary elevational view showing the manner in which a two-piece lapel is formed; FIGURE 13 is a fragmentary elevational view of the lapel shown in FIGURE 12 after it has been folded into position along the roll line thereof; and FIGURE 14 is a cross-section showing the manner in which the two sections of the collar and lapel shown in FIGURE 12 are joined, said section being taken along line 1414 of FIGURE 12. The method of finishing a lapel in accordance with the present invention will now be more fully described. FIGURE 1 illustrates a fragment of a lapel blank which has been cut from the fabric of which the garment is to be formed and is designated generally by the numeral 20. The fabric is cut to the general configuration of the lapel to be formed and a notch 21 of the desired dimensions is provided in the blank. A notched gusset 22 of the same fabric as the garment is applied in the region of the apex portion 23 of the notch 21 as by means of a line of stitching 24. The purpose of the gusset is ultimately to provide a finished appearance for the apex portion of the notch as will more clearly appear hereafter. As may be seen in FIGURE 2, a strip of binding tape 27 is dis posed flat in face-toface relation with the fabric along the raw edge 25 thereof and secured in position by means of a line of stitching 26. It will be noted that the tape 27 is aligned with the lapel edge and is stitched to the undersurface of the gusset 22. In stitching the tape to the undersurface of the gusset, the tape is folded upon itself, as may be more clearly seen in FIGURE 8, so that the free edge 28 thereof extends away from the perimeter of the gusset. It will be further noted that at the lower end 29 of the roll line 30 of the lapel the tape 27 is slashed, as shown at 31, and then applied along the edge of [the reverse side B of the lapel fabric 20 along the lower edge of the jacket. This reversal is necessary in order to maintain the finished appearance along the lower edge of the jacket when worn. The tape is then turned to the reverse side B of the body of the lapel and is stitched in position by a line of stitching 32, as shown in FIGURES 3 and 10, so that the stitched edges of the fabric and tape are encased. The excess portion 33 of the free edge of the tape 27 is then trimmed away. It should be noted that in turning over the taped gusset of the notch, the position of the gusset is reversed and brought around to the reverse surface B of the fabric, thereby presenting a continuous surface along both sides of the lapel and the edge of the apex portion of the notch. FIGURE 4 illustrates the appearance of the lapel edge after the excess tape has been trimmed away. In preparation for the next step in finishing the lapel, each of the corners 34 and 34a is folded upon itself and a line of diagonal stitching 40 is applied across the corner as shown in FIGURE 5 and the corners are then clipped. The turned edge of the lapel is then folded over upon itself as shown in FIGURES 6 and 11 and a line of stitching 35 is applied therealong so as to secure the folded-over edge in position. The clipped corners 34 and 34a permit the formation of sharp corners when this folding-over operation is carried out. It will be noted particularly from FIGURE 11 that when the tape reinforced edge of the lapel is folded upon itself and stitched in position, only the bight portions 36 and 37 are exposed toward the inside of the lapel and a generally fiat bight 41 is formed along the outside edge thereof. Consequently, the edge of the lapel presents a highly finished appearance in which only the material of the garment is exposed to view. The edge is not only finished off with an aesthetically pleasing appearance but it is also reinforced by means of the folded tape which is practically invisible as well as by the fabric fold. FIGURES 12 and 13 illustrate a garment lapel formed of two pieces commonly known as a set-in collar. The edge of the lapel and collar are formed in the manner herein described, with the exception that since the collar 38 is formed independently of the lapel body 39, it is not necessary to apply a gusset to form a finished lapel notch. The collar and lapel portions of the garment are united to each other by a line of stitching 41, as indicated in FIGURE 14. It will be apparent from the foregoing that by forming a lapel in the manner herein indicated, the necessity for using a facing material is obviated. Furthermore, a highly finished edge is provided for the garment which is reinforced against distortion or stretch by means of a double fold formed by the garment material and the reinforcing tape. The product comprises a garment or a lapel portion therefor wherein the raw edge of the fabric has been turned in. The bight formed by the turning of the edge is disposed so that it is directed inwardly of the fabric body. Intermediate said inturned fabric edge and the fabric body there is disposed a binding tape which is folded over upon itself and presents a bight directed inwardly of the fabric body. The fabric body is itself folded over the entire assembly and forms a bight which encompasses the raw edge and the tape edges and forms the marginal edge for the garment or lapel. While I have here shown and described a preferred embodiment of my invention, it will be apparent however that this invention is not limited to this embodiment and that many changes, additions and modifications can be made in connection therewith without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as herein disclosed and hereinafter claimed. Having described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: 1. The method of forming a finished edge on the fabric body of a garment comprising the steps of securing a binding tape fiat along the raw edge of said fabric body, turning said taped raw edge to the reverse side of said fabric body, folding the tape back upon itself toward the fabric body, securing said turned tape and edge in position, folding over said turned edge upon itself and securing said folded-over portion to said fabric body to thereby provide a finished edge for said garment. 2. The method of forming a finished edge for a garment body comprising the steps of stitching a binding tape along the raw edge of the fabric body in face-to-face relation therewith, turning said taped raw edge to the reverse side of said fabric body folding the tape back upon itself toward the fabric body and stitching said turned taped edge to said fabric body, folding over said stitched turned edge upon itself and stitching said folded-over portion to said fabric body to thereby provide a finished edge for said garment. 3. The method of forming a finished edge for a garment body comprising the steps of stitching a binding tape along the raw edge of the fabric body in face-toface relation therewith, turning said taped raw edge to the reverse side of said fabric body, folding the tape back upon itself toward the fabric body and stitching said turned taped edge to said fabric body, trimming the free edge of said tape to remove the excess therefrom, folding over said stitched turned edge upon itself and stitching said folded-over portion to said fabric body to thereby provide a finished edge for said garment. References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 289,604 Beiermeister Dec. 4, 1883 1,534,563 Barker Apr. 21, 1925 1,862,377 Harper June 7, 1932 2,182,911 Bowman Dec. 12, 1939 2,448,495 Muecke Aug. 31, 1948 2,515,038 Harper July 11, 1950 2,685,089 Rand et al. Aug. 3, 1954

Description

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Patent Citations (7)

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    US-1534563-AApril 21, 1925Lion Collars & Shirts IncFold collar
    US-1862377-AJune 07, 1932Arthur J C HarperGarment edge
    US-2182911-ADecember 12, 1939Lewis Invisible Stitch MachineMethod of forming seams
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NO-Patent Citations (0)

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    US-2003163861-A1September 04, 2003Shlomo AvrahamiReligious article with reinforced edges
    US-2011180102-A1July 28, 2011Team Effort, Inc.Golf towel
    US-8851090-B2October 07, 2014Team Effort, Inc.Golf towel